TAA Lessons

TAA September Lesson

First, if your students haven’t completed the survey then please do so now. 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/695DQ8X

Don’t forget to remind your students about your Character Ed word of the month: Initiative and encourage them to complete the Initiative challenge. We have been giving away some great prizes to our winners. 

TAA Lesson

Agriculture, Architecture and Construction are the focus clusters for September. The following videos explore these careers in more detail. Please view these videos with your students.

https://youtu.be/Qkf9GUwHPV8

https://youtu.be/ImTTW94ZicM

Follow up after viewing:

Do you know someone that works in these fields?

Do any of these career options sound interesting to you? 

Which one? 

Why?

If you have time, click on the links to the PCCCA website below to explore the classes needed to complete these Career Pathways.

 

https://www.polk.k12.ga.us/PCCCA/Content2/1232

 

https://www.polk.k12.ga.us/PCCCA/Content2/1240

TAA October Lesson

October 

Click the links below to watch two brief videos about our October Career Clusters. Then complete the activities about cyber bullying below. 

 

https://youtu.be/hnTVOdtxpEQ

 

https://youtu.be/m0OaoY4hGYE

 

Arts, Audio/Visual Technology, and Communications:

 

In the Arts, Audio/Visual Technology, and Communications cluster, you have two avenues. One is to be the performer or artist. The other is to work behind the scenes to make the performance or publication happen. As a reporter, actor, or fine artist, you would use your creative talents. To assure that a concert or magazine is successful, you would use computers and sound equipment. The occupations in this cluster allow you to use your creativity, talent, and technical skills.

 

Business Management and Administration:

 

In the Business Management and Administration cluster, there are many career options. You may provide the needed support to keep a business in operation. Or you might keep track of the expenses and income. You could manage the financial activities of a business. Another option is to be sure that a business has qualified employees who are trained to do their jobs. Or after years of education or experience, you might direct the operations of a business.

 

Bullying Lesson

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Text bullying is when someone is sending mean, false, embarrassing or hurtful text messages, Instant Messages, Direct Messages or SnapChats to or about someone using their phone. 

Read the scenario below and answer the questions. 

Emma has been receiving horrible text messages over the last few weeks from an unknown number calling her nasty names. These texts have started to come every day during class and even night when she is at home. Emma has been showing signs of anxiety every time her phone goes off and she doesn’t talk much anymore. She doesn’t know who is sending them and is too afraid to tell her parents about it because she doesn’t want them to take away her phone. 

  1. What do you think Emma should do in this situation? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 
  2. What would you do if Emma told you about these texts? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 
  3. What could end up happening if Emma allows this harassment to continue? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 
  4. Why do you think Emma won’t talk to anyone about this? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 
  5. What could you do if you heard who was responsible for these messages? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 

Bullying using Instagram often involves people publicly humiliating others for all to see. Harassment can also exist via private direct messages too. 

Read the scenario below and answer the questions. 

Monique decided to set up an Instagram account as everyone else her age seems to have one. She has been using it to post selfies a lot: she puts in a lot of effort for each picture, sometimes taking up to 30 photos to find just one that she likes. She feels a lot of pressure to take a perfect photo as some people can be really cruel in the comments, constantly telling her she has a big nose and that she is ugly. Sometimes these comments even appear to come from “strangers”. 

1.    What do you think Monique should do in this situation? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 

2.    How do you think Monique might be feeling? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 

3.    Why do you think the bullies chose to use Instagram to insult Monique’s appearance? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 

4.    What could the lasting effects be on Monique if this cyber bullying continues? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 

5.    What could you do if you see a nasty comment on Monique’s Instagram page? ________________________________________________________________________ 

 

Cyber-Bullying Discussion Points to be Discussed with the Group

Is cyber-bullying as serious as other kinds of bullying?  Explain.

What advice would you give someone being cyber-bullied? 

If someone puts information about themselves online, does that give others     the right to say whatever they want about it? 

At what point does ‘teasing’ cross the line to harassment? 

What reasons might people cyber bully others? 

Why do you think teenagers might be reluctant to tell people if they are being cyber bullied? 

Do you think schools have a right to get involved in cyber bullying incidents? Explain. 

 

TAA November 

 

Click Here for a video on Education and Training

Career Cluster Pathways

Cluster Resources

What It's About

The Education Program Concentration is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the Education field. There are many diverse opportunities in Education, from a school administrator, school counselor, elementary school teacher, special needs teacher, secondary teacher, post secondary teacher, career and technical teacher, preschool teacher, paraprofessional – and the list continues. Students will have two career pathways to choose from: Early Childhood Education & Teaching as a Profession. These pathways will introduce the foundations of education, combined with knowledge and skills, gained in both the classroom and in the workplace, to prepare students for a career in Education.

Why It's Important

Education and how we can improve the education of our students is a major focus in Georgia, as well as many other states in the nation. The large number of educators that are at, or nearing the age of retirement, combined with the small number of teacher educators graduating from college, is a concern. These are reasons this Education Program Area is important – we need to start growing our own teachers in communities across Georgia. 

 

The Energy Career Cluster prepares individuals for careers in the designing, planning, maintaining, generating, transmission, and distribution of traditional and alternative energy.

Click here for a video about Energy.

Career Cluster Pathways

STEM Pathways

Energy Pathways

Manufacturing

Program Resources

Middle School Engineering and Technology courses 

What It's About 

The purpose of Technology Education is to develop technological literacy as part of all students' fundamental education through an activity-based study of past, present, and future technological systems and their resources, processes, and impact on society. Technology Education utilizes computer and educational technology in the delivery of content related to systems of communication, energy/power-transportation, production, and bio-related technologies. 

In addition to classroom/ laboratory experiences, students participate in the Technology Student Association (TSA). Activities of the TSA are an integral part of the instructional program because they promote leadership skills, high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety. Opportunities are provided for involvement with the community's industrial and technological resources, in parliamentary procedures and democratic decision making, and for recognition for exemplary performance. 

Key Practices 

Curriculum Development/Articulation: 

  • Develop state standards for curriculum development and assessment purposes, aligned with professional associations that impact technology education. 
  • Develop curriculum and curriculum guides that contain a variety of methodologies (e.g., design briefs, culminating activities, modular instruction, delivery) in all middle school and high school courses. 
  • Complete feasibility study with Trade and Industrial Education to determine curriculum approach. 
  • Develop program descriptions that accurately describe the scope, design, and objectives of each course. 
  • Develop toolbox sample programs, career paths, and programs or study guides for middle and high schools. 

Work-Based Learning:

  • Develop and implement state resources and a database of individuals, industry, and postsecondary institutes to provide assistance, job shadowing, mentors, internships, apprenticeships, guest speakers, field trips, and on-site placement for technology-related fields. 
  • Develop and implement methodologies such as problem solving, design briefs, and other culminating activities that enhance the study of industry. o Correlate curriculum with the different areas of industry and ensure that curriculum introduces students to the organizational structure of industry. 

Industry Certification:

  • Identify the industrial areas of Technology Education that align with specific industrial areas and align curriculum for specific industry certifications. 
  • Develop and update facility specifications and guidelines that use current technologies and techniques of industry for middle schools and high schools. 
  • Determine special needs adaptations of equipment in Technology Education programs. 

Professional Development:

  • Provide staff development for teachers in the use of emerging technology. 
  • Provide staff development to train teachers in the repair of technological tools. 
  • Provide staff development in the use of International Technology Education Association consortium products. 
  • Provide staff development to enhance student experience and understanding of industry, including use of different types of work-based learning experiences. 

See Also

Cluster Resources

Engineering Resources

Web Resources

 

TAA January 

Healthcare Science and Hospitality and Tourism

Health Science 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT-gv8KfII8&list=PLwaY7Ha3fP_K1ehOYELehG16aKVZWoOcj&index=9

 

The Health Science Career Cluster includes planning, managing, and providing services in therapeutics, diagnostics, health informatics, support areas, and biotechnology research and development.

Middle School Healthcare Science courses 

Career Planning 

Healthcare Science Education - Providing a pipeline for the healthcare workers of the future

By the year 2014, health services will account for one in every twelve jobs in Georgia. It is projected to increase by almost 100,000 jobs, placing its employment levels at more than 420,000 jobs by 2014. Georgia Workforce Trends, an Analysis of Long-term Employment Projections to 2014. 

Georgia Dept. of Labor – Michael Thurmond, Commissioner Published by Workforce Information & Analysis Division

Healthcare Science Technology Education programs are designed to provide students the opportunity to explore careers in healthcare. This course of study will provide students with a smooth transition into post-secondary nursing, medical or allied health education or the ability to acquire an entry level medical position in the workforce or the military. Students are exposed to general healthcare knowledge and skills and are then encouraged to pursue a more in depth study in the career area they are interested in through the appropriate career pathway. The pathways that are currently available in the healthcare program of study include: Therapeutic Services - Nursing, Therapeutic Medical Services, and Emergency Services along with Health Informatics, Diagnostics, and Biotechnology, and Physical Medicine.

 

In the program, a strong emphasis is placed on academic integration into the curriculum as well as the necessary foundation skills such as problem solving, teamwork, and critical thinking which are necessary to enter the workforce. A middle school curriculum offered introduces careers in healthcare at an earlier age. 

 

Georgia SkillsUSA is offered through the healthcare programs and is a co-curricular component that compliments the classroom experience along with work based learning opportunities. Employment in the healthcare industry will provide students with a financially stable and rewarding career of service to others. Having a chance to begin this quest while still in middle or high school is a wonderful way for student to prepare for their future.

 

Hospitality and Tourism

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJvZ7VGqRg8&list=PLwaY7Ha3fP_K1ehOYELehG16aKVZWoOcj&index=10

 

 

The Hospitality & Tourism Career Cluster encompasses the management, marketing, and operations of restaurants, and other food services, lodging, attractions, recreation events, and travel related services.

 

What It's About 

Culinary Arts is a growing program in our schools across Georgia. This program is designed for those wanting to learn the “art” of cooking and for those wanting to continue in the Arts field in any of the many diverse opportunities: Sous Chef, Pastry Chef, Kitchen manager, Garde Manger, Banquet Chef, or a Restaurant Entrepreneur.

Why It's Important 

Opportunities in the Culinary field are high in demand, wages and skills. Individuals in this field gain knowledge in diet, nutrition, food preparation, cost and budgets, and the science of food. As society looks for more convenience, this increases the demand of dining establishments and skillful individuals to work there.

Curriculum Development/Articulation 

The Culinary Arts curriculum is based on American Culinary Federation Standards, and does have articulations with Technical Colleges in Georgia, as well as many of the finest Culinary Arts schools in the nation. A complete list may be found in the resource section.

The Introduction course introduces students to fundamental preparation terms, concepts, and methods in Culinary Arts where laboratory practice parallels class work. There is emphasis on basic kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, equipment maintenance and operation procedures. The course also provides an overview of the professionalism in the industry and career opportunities leading into a career pathway in Culinary Arts.

The two Culinary Arts courses build on the techniques and skills learned in the Introductory course as students begin to gain in-depth knowledge and hands on skill mastery. Strong importance is given to refining hands on production of the classic fundamentals in the commercial kitchen.

Work-Based Learning 

Classroom instruction and hands on lab experiences are only a portion of a student’s experience in this program. Numerous work based activities are available: guest speakers, job shadowing, career fairs, and internships, to name a few.

Industry Certification 

Schools have an opportunity to have their program certified by a leading partner in the industry, the American Culinary Federation.

TAA February

Human Services 

The Human Services Career Cluster prepares individuals for employment activities related to family and human needs such as nutrition and food science, counseling and mental health services, family and community services, personal care, and consumer services.

 

https://youtu.be/LPtyZ2ipQBM

 

https://youtu.be/orXrXNbckHw

 

Middle School Family and Consumer Sciences courses 

 

§  20.01100 Family and Consumer Sciences (Grade 6)

§  20.01200 Family and Consumer Sciences (Grade 7)

§  20.01300 Family and Consumer Sciences (Grade 8)

 

What It's About 

Family and Consumer Sciences program prepares students for post secondary education and careers in the business related aspects of family and consumer sciences. It provides opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that students need to become responsible citizens and leaders; and to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse global society. 

In addition to classroom/ laboratory instruction, which aids in the development of academic and technical skills, the Family and Consumer Sciences program also includes participation in the Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), a career and technical student organization. FCCLA provides an array of activities to enhance student academic and technical competencies and develop leadership and communication skills. 

Why It's Important 

 

Nutrition and Food Sciences: 

§  Nutrition is an important life skill – without proper nutrition, individuals may develop many health related diseases and disorders. 

§  Food Science enables research to develop new products in the market place that might prevent disease or add longevity to your life. 

 

Students that choose this pathway may further their studies for a career as a nutritionist, dietitian, or food scientist. 

Consumer Services: 

§  Serious financial problems are arising among consumers. It is important for students to understand budgets, credit, consumer rights and responsibilities 

 

Students that choose this pathway may further their studies for a career in credit counseling, financial planning, or a number of consumer services. 

Interior Design: 

§  The media has played an enormous role in the interest of this pathway. Design is all around us whether in the home, a commercial business or retail establishment. 

§  This pathway also has a focus on textile science and how to test and determine appropriate uses for textiles as they relate to interior design. 

 

Students that pursue this pathway may further their studies for a career as an interior designer, interior decorator, showroom designer or textile scientist. 

Career Related Education

All career pathways in Family and Consumer Sciences have career related activities which will prepare students for the school to career transition. The range of these activities varies from job shadowing, internships, cooperative education and youth apprenticeship. 

Information Technology

The rapidly changing digital world of the Information Technology Career Cluster engages students in hands-on learning to prepare for careers that create, use, modify, and engage technology skills. Graphics, multimedia animation, web design, game and application development, networking, and computer repair are all possibilities.

 

https://youtu.be/GMfs_9wLG6I

 

Information Technology

§  Cybersecurity

§  Computer Science

§  Health Information Technology

§  Game Design

§  Information Support and Services

§  Internet of Things

§  Networking

§  Programming

§  Web and Digital Design

§  Web Development

 

TAA March

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security and Manufacturing

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

https://youtu.be/uWdMTB2aZO4

The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security Career Cluster prepares individuals for employment relating to emergency and fire services, legal services, protective services, and homeland security.

Plan of Study documents

Manufacturing 

https://youtu.be/58dPv5T1jtM

The Manufacturing Career Cluster includes the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities, such as production control, maintenance, and process engineering.

 

Plan of Study documents

TAA April 

Marketing and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Marketing

https://youtu.be/ZmaljDpUDFI

Marketing is the process of anticipating, managing, and satisfying consumers' demand for products, services, and ideas. The Marketing Career Cluster generates the strategy that underlies advertising and promotional techniques, business communication, and business development.

 

Middle School Marketing, Sales and Service courses 

Purpose 

The Marketing Education Program is designed to prepare students for postsecondary education and careers in marketing, management and entrepreneurship. Students develop knowledge and skills in the foundational areas of marketing (economics, human relations and business basics) and the functional areas of marketing (product and service planning, marketing-information management, purchasing and pricing, selling and promotion, risk management, financing and distribution/logistics), as well as in international marketing, management and entrepreneurship. 

Goals 

§  Develop critical thinking skills in order to make informed decisions. 

§  Integrate academic skills into the marketing/management curriculum in order to insure that students develop excellent written and verbal communication skills, computational skills, and scientific problem-solving skills. 

§  Develop cooperative learning skills in order to work effectively with teams to find solutions to problems, create new systems, etc. 

§  Develop human relations skills and an appreciation for diversity through classroom experiences (such as cooperative learning and simulations), student organizational experiences (DECA competitive events) and work-based learning experiences (coops, internships, practicums, shadowing, mentoring, etc.) 

§  Use technology to gather and present information, solve problems and manage the workflow. 

§  Demonstrate proficiency in the foundational and functional areas of marketing by applying the knowledge and skills learned through the curriculum, the work-based learning component and the competitive events (DECA activities). 

§  Manage work by effectively planning, organizing and allocating resources. 

Instructional Programs 

§  Marketing/Management 

§  Fashion Marketing 

§  Food Marketing, Sales and Distribution 

§  Travel and Tourism 

§  Hotel and Lodging Management 

§  Sports and Entertainment Marketing 

Key Practices 

Outcome-Based Curriculum

The new and revised curriculum (which has resulted from the development of Instructional Programs) is composed of outcome-based competencies. Therefore, the teaching/learning focus is on the final results rather than the process. Marketing Education teachers are lecturing less and facilitating more, and as a result, students are taking charge of their own learning by using technology to research topics, collect data and present information orally and in written form. More Marketing Education programs are incorporating school-based enterprises in order for students to apply business and marketing concepts learned in the classroom. 

Industry Certification: 

The American Marketing Association and the Georgia Department of Education continue to refine the standards by which exemplary Marketing Education Programs are evaluated and certified. The strength of these business partnerships insures that curriculum meets industry specifications. 

School-Based Enterprises: 

Running an actual business allows students to learn contextually without leaving school. Textbook concepts become real as students operate a business for profit, review and revise operational procedures, resolve problems and handle human relations issues. 

Work-Based Learning: 

Cooperative experiences, internships, shadowing and mentoring opportunities provide depth and breadth of learning in the instructional program and allow students to apply the concepts learned in the classroom. Students are exposed to a variety of careers and learn work ethics. 

Student Organization: 

Participation in DECA, an Association of Marketing Education Students provides a vehicle for students to employ higher order thinking skills, to interact with high-level business people and to further enhance their leadership skills through their participation in regional, state and national competitive events and local activities.

 

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

https://youtu.be/ylAgufbMYyU

The Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics Career Cluster means planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services.

 

Middle School Engineering and Technology courses 

What It's About 

The purpose of Technology Education is to develop technological literacy as part of all students' fundamental education through an activity-based study of past, present, and future technological systems and their resources, processes, and impact on society. Technology Education utilizes computer and educational technology in the delivery of content related to systems of communication, energy/power-transportation, production, and bio-related technologies. 

In addition to classroom/ laboratory experiences, students participate in the Technology Student Association (TSA). Activities of the TSA are an integral part of the instructional program because they promote leadership skills, high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety. Opportunities are provided for involvement with the community's industrial and technological resources, in parliamentary procedures and democratic decision making, and for recognition for exemplary performance. 

Why It's Important 

 

I get so much more than just a paycheck. They make me feel like I am an important part of this Siemens plant and that the work I do is of high quality and needed by Siemens. 

Sean Carty, Apprenticeship Student
Siemens Energy and Automation 
Forsyth, Georgia 

Key Practices 

Curriculum Development/Articulation: 

  • Develop state standards for curriculum development and assessment purposes, aligned with professional associations that impact technology education. 
  • Develop curriculum and curriculum guides that contain a variety of methodologies (e.g., design briefs, culminating activities, modular instruction, delivery) in all middle school and high school courses. 
  • Complete feasibility study with Trade and Industrial Education to determine curriculum approach. 
  • Develop program descriptions that accurately describe the scope, design, and objectives of each course. 
  • Develop toolbox sample programs, career paths, and programs or study guides for middle and high schools. 

Work-Based Learning:

  • Develop and implement state resources and a database of individuals, industry, and postsecondary institutes to provide assistance, job shadowing, mentors, internships, apprenticeships, guest speakers, field trips, and on-site placement for technology-related fields. 
  • Develop and implement methodologies such as problem solving, design briefs, and other culminating activities that enhance the study of industry. o Correlate curriculum with the different areas of industry and ensure that curriculum introduces students to the organizational structure of industry. 

Industry Certification:

  • Identify the industrial areas of Technology Education that align with specific industrial areas and align curriculum for specific industry certifications. 
  • Develop and update facility specifications and guidelines that use current technologies and techniques of industry for middle schools and high schools. 
  • Determine special needs adaptations of equipment in Technology Education programs. 

Professional Development:

  • Provide staff development for teachers in the use of emerging technology. 
  • Provide staff development to train teachers in the repair of technological tools. 
  • Provide staff development in the use of International Technology Education Association consortium products. 
  • Provide staff development to enhance student experience and understanding of industry, including use of different types of work-based learning experiences. 

See Also

TAA May

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics 

https://youtu.be/0AWSEcoZSgI

 

The Transportation, Distribution & Logistics Career Cluster encompasses planning, managing, and moving people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail, and water, and also includes other related professional and technical support services.

Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Career Pathways

What It's About

Trade and Industrial Education programs equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the trade and industrial field and for further education. Programs of instruction are offered in Communication Technologies, Personal Services, Protective Services, Construction Technology, Mechanical Occupations, Automotive Technology, Precision Production Occupations, and Manufacturing Sciences. Trade and Industrial Education programs include three major components:

§  Classroom/laboratory experiences, which enable students to develop technical and academic skills in laboratories that simulate the business or industrial work environment for the given area.

§  Work-based learning and youth apprenticeship programs, may be selected by students as a strategy for obtaining more intensive skill development in the workplace.

§  SkillsUSA Georgia, the Career Technical Student Organization, provides opportunities for students to participate in co-curricular activities that help them develop academic and technical skills and encourages them to become better citizens.

Why It's Important

The automotive industry demands a rigid adherence to quality, and our product and manufacturing is considered highly technical. Combine this with a tight labor market, and it is critical that we have a well-educated workforce. The secondary technical education students have helped us considerably-they are motivated, well prepared, and appreciate being able to learn valuable job skills while they further their education. To date, we have had 19 students complete the program and become full-time employees. 

Elizabeth Umberson, Plant Manager

ZF Industries 

Gainesville, Georgia

I am a former student in a vocational construction program and have employed students from these programs. The logic and knowledge one gains in the programs make students capable of deciding their career for the future. The experience one receives is of excellent quality. The education and training received helps establish a groundwork for deciding their future in construction. I will continue to use and support students from these programs. 

Billy Helton, Owner

Helton Electrical Services 

Warthen, Georgia

Key Practices​

Curriculum Development/Articulation:

§  Update current curriculum to meet industry-recognized standards and align with requirements of industry certification.

§  Modify instructional design to more fully cover high-order thinking skills such as problem solving, synthesis, and critical and reflective thinking.

§  Align coursework with postsecondary, four-year baccalaureate, and industry apprenticeship programs.

§  Revise curriculum to include the integration of process technology, software, standards, building codes, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations.

§  Develop a career exploration curriculum in Trade and Industry Education for use at the middle school level.

Work-Based Learning:

§  Provide a strong work-based component in all Trade and Industrial programs to include an orderly transition to Diversified Cooperative Training and youth apprenticeship programs.

§  Revise Diversified Cooperative Training program guides.

§  Recruit additional Trade and Industrial industry partners.

§  Coordinate efforts of Trade and Industrial faculty, Diversified Cooperative Training coordinator, and Youth Apprenticeship Program coordinator.

Industry Certification:

§  Develop industry certification standards for program areas not currently serviced by sponsoring trade associations.

§  Expand industry certification to include Automotive and Electronics.

§  Update facility specifications and equipment lists for industry certification. 

§  Modify and equip laboratories and classrooms to accommodate special populations students.

Professional Development:

§  Provide staff development for integrating academic and vocational training.

§  Provide staff development for meeting the needs of students from special populations.

§  Implement industry-based staff development activities.

§  Provide joint activities for teachers in Trade and Industrial, Technology, career exploration, and career education regarding the mission, role, and relationships of these programs.

§  Provide mentoring opportunities for new teachers.

§  Provide staff development on the integration and application of new technology.

§  Provide staff development on strategies for articulating secondary, postsecondary, and industry apprenticeship programs.​​​​​