Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar
Week 4/ August 28 to September 1

August 28 2017

Essential Question:

What are the foundations of civilization?  Why did civilization start in Mesopotamia?

Standards:

SSWH1 Analyze the origins, structures, and interactions of societies in the ancient world

from 3500 BCE/BC to 500 BCE/BC.

a. Compare and contrast Mesopotamian and Egyptian societies, include: religion, culture,

economics, politics, and technology.

Activator:

Of the following characteristics of civilization, which do you think is the most important?  Which is the least? Tell me why for both.

Characteristics of Civilization

1.Surplus of food.

2.Large towns, with some form of government

3.People perform different jobs (Division of Labor)

4.Development of a calendar

5.Form of writing

 

Teaching Strategies:

Students will be introduced to Mesopotamia as the birthplace of civilization.  There will also be a discussion of the concept of civilization.

We will then look at and discuss Hammurabi’s Code.  As this is the first time we have used primary sources in this class, this is meant to serve as a general introduction to how primary sources will be used, and how they should be examined.  This will be a whole group activity with independent reading, and some class and independent examination of the document.

Classnotes-

Mesopotamia was the birthplace of civilization.  The city-states of ancient Mesopotamia developed in the Fertile Crescent between the Tigris and Euphrates.  Cities were walled with a central Ziggurat, which served as a religious and political center (theocracy).  Kings were considered divine.  The economy was primarily agricultural with some commerce and industry.  City-states traded amongst themselves, which increased the overall success of Mesopotamian culture.  There were major social distinctions, with groups ranging from elites to slaves.  This class distinction came from the division of labor that developed as society grew in complexity and population grew.  Many empires conquered this area and the city-states (which were politically divided) were often at war with one another.  The flooding of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers were also unpredictable.  Learning to control water through irrigation allowed for greater productivity and larger populations.  Improved irrigation technology and better tools allowed for even greater productivity.  Mesopotamia lacked few natural barriers and was often invaded.  The disorder of the environment and warfare also influenced their religion and they viewed their gods and religion as being very unpredictable.  Over time the warring city states in Mesopotamia were conquered by strong leaders.  One of the most important was the Babylonian King Hammurabi.  Hammurabi's Code was the first written law code in history.  Both the Mesopotamian’s (cuneiform) and Egyptian’s (hieroglyphics) had systems of writing.

 

Student's will then read and evaluate a primary source.  Students will be told to answer several questions on a historical thinking chart.  As this is the first primary source we will lookat, some time will be spent explaining primary sources in detail.  

Hammurabi’s Code Activity CLICK HERE

SOAPS Document Analysis Worksheet CLICK HERE

Historical Thinking Chart CLICK HERE

Summarizer:

We will complete a scenario asks us is a source is primary or secondary.

Primary vs. secondary activity CLICK HERE

Differentiation:

Whole Group readings, individual reading, whole group work, independent work

 

August 29 2017

Essential Question:

What factors allowed Egyptian society to succeed?

Standards:

a. Compare and contrast Mesopotamian and Egyptian societies, include: religion, culture,

economics, politics, and technology.

Activator:

https://discoveringegypt.com/egyptian-hieroglyphic-writing/hieroglyphic-typewriter/

Students will be provided with a message in hieroglyphics and be asked to translate.  This will lead to a more general discussion about language.

Teaching Strategies:

Students will be introduced to Egyptian society.  They will then be asked to consider the question of who built the pyramids.  Students will be placed in small groups (3-4), and each group will be asked to consider this question by examining documents about the construction of the pyramids.  Each document has questions that help lead to an answer.  After each group has gotten a chance to examine the documents we will discuss as a class.

Who Built the Pyramids Documents CLICK HERE

Classnotes-

In Egypt the Nile River flooded annually, which lead to a surplus of food.  The Nile unified Upper and Lower Egypt, but also unified all Egyptians together based on a common need for what the Nile provided.  Deserts provided natural barriers to invasion, and provided a confidence in the stability of things.  Egyptian history is divided into three phases, the Old Kingdom, Middle Kingdom, and New Kingdom.  By the New Kingdom phase Egypt had become a regional power.  A commonality in the three kingdoms is that the Egyptians were Polytheistic and believed in natural forces.  They also believed in a divine god-like pharaoh who was leader of the political and religious systems. The Pyramids demonstrated the authority of the pharaoh.  Religion and government were very much connected=THEOCRACY.   Over time Egyptian culture was exported to other kingdoms in the region.  Egypt also borrowed heavily from Mesopotamian techniques and technology early on, emphasizing why Mesopotamia was the birthplace of civilization.  Egypt however quickly created its own distinctive culture.  For example, both Egyptian and Mesopotamian cultures were polytheistic, but Mesopotamian gods were unpredictable and chaotic, while Egyptian Gods were predictable and would offer rewards for good works.  These beliefs reflected the societies these religions developed in.

 

Summarizer:

Socrative-Egypt or Mesopotamia or Both or Neither 

Differentiation:

Small Group readings, small group work

 

August 30 2017

Essential Question:

Standards:

b. Describe the societies of India and China, include: religion, culture, economics, politics,

and technology.

 

Activator:

Look at your world map and map of Asia.  What do you notice about India?  Why was it called a subcontinent?  What lies to the North?  What lies to the South?

Teaching Strategies:

Classnotes-

India was a land with vast diversity in its geography, peoples, society, and culture.   India was separated from other places by the Himalayas to the North, the Hindu Kush to the West, and the Indian Ocean to the South.  Civilization developed along the Ganges and Indus River, with the Indus River Valley being the most important.  Early Indian civilization developed around the cities of Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa, but little is known about the civilizations.  These early Indian peoples were conquered by a group of Indo-Europeans known as the Aryans, who created the Kingdom of Magadha.  Over time the Aryans imposed a very strict class system, known as the caste system.  Whatever caste you were born in, you were stuck there.  If you did your duties well in your caste (or followed your dharma, the requirements placed on your caste), you might be reincarnated into a higher/better caste.  In India, the family, not the individual, was the basic unit of society.  

 

Students will then be asked to write three things:

1.They will write as if they are someone living under the caste system in ancient times.

2.They will write as if they are someone living under the caste system in modern day times.

3.They will provide their own opinion on the caste system.

2-3 sentences for each will be sufficient.  Some students will share their writings.

Summarizer:

Students will share their caste system writings and we will discuss why the caste system existed and some positives and negatives to the system.

Some time will also be spent making sure students are keeping their notebooks organized.

Differentiation:

Independent writing

 

August 31 2017

Essential Question:

Standards:

b. Describe the societies of India and China, include: religion, culture, economics, politics,

and technology.

c. Explain the development of monotheism, include: the concepts developed by the ancient

Hebrews.

 

Activator:

History Question from USATest Prep.

Teaching Strategies:

Classnotes-

China also had civilization very early on.  Society developed along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers.  In legend the first Chinese dynasty is the Xia dynasty which helped control the water in China.  The first known dynasty is the Shang dynasty.  Under the Shang, government was centralized with a strong bureaucracy.  Many influential belief systems developed under the Shang.

 

Although most Mesopotamians and early civilizations were polytheistic  (believed in many gods)  there were two major monotheistic (belief in one god) religions in the region.  The Israelites (or Hebrews) who believed in one God  (Yahweh) and the Persians who followed Zoroastrianism (universal god called Ahuramazda and good vs. evil).  The Hebrews had a series of laws called the Ten Commandments, and a sacred book called the Torah.  The Hebrew people did have a short lived kingdom, that was eventually conquered by the Babylonians.  Even though the Kingdom ended, religion held the Hebrew people together,

 

Students will be provided with two heads, one representing someone that represents a Hebrew and another that represents someone who believed in Zoroastrianism.  In each each head they must include the beliefs of each religion and what each thinks about other religions we have discussed. (Mesopotamians, Egyptians, etc.)

 

Summarizer:

Students will write their own multiple choice question related to toady’s content.  They will write 5-8 questions.  They will then trade with classmeates, if time allows.

Differentiation:

Creative assignment based on religion.

 

 

 

September 1 2017

Essential Question:

Standards:

d. Identify the Bantu migration patterns and contribution to settled agriculture.

 

Activator:

Students will brainstorm the following:  If people do not leave written records how can we find about their lives?  We will discuss.

Teaching Strategies:

Classnotes-

Africa was physically a very diverse place.  There were savannas (areas of dry grassland), tropical rain forests,  jungles, and deserts.  One of the key geographical features of Africa was the Sahara desert.  All of Africa south of the Sahara is known as sub-Saharan Africa, and included jungles, savannas, and rivers.  Travel across the Sahara, north to south, was very difficult.  A group called the Berbers helped carry goods across the Sahara, so even though the Sahara divided the continent it does not stop movement.  At any one time Africa has both highly developed societies and complex civilizations.  Africa’s diverse geography led to diverse cultures, societies, and developments.  Early Africans did not have a written language.  Much of what we know comes from stories, poems, and songs passed from one generation to another.  A language group called the Bantu peoples spread north to south and helped fill the African continent.  The Bantu people originally came from the Middle East and settled in West Africa, but later migrated over large parts of the African continent.  Bantu’s were hunter gatherers, but over time settled down into agricultural settlements, and became the basis for most future civilizations.  These Bantu peoples provided a common historic heritage to peoples all over Africa.

 

Half of the class will be provided the term archeology.  The other will be provided the term anthropology.  No matter what, students will be asked to do independent research, and how both helps us learn about people who don't leave written records.

Summarizer:

Students will be shown either a video or google earth images of important archeological findings.

Students will be reminded that they will have their first notebook check on the next week.

Differentiation:

Flexible grouping

Contact Us
Polk School District 612 South College St.
Cedartown, GA 30125
View Map & Directions
Phone: 770-748-3821
Fax: 770-748-5131
Translator     
Google-Translate-Chinese (Simplified) BETA Google-Translate-English to French Google-Translate-English to German Google-Translate-English to Italian Google-Translate-English to Japanese BETA Google-Translate-English to Korean BETA Google-Translate-English to Russian BETA Google-Translate-English to Spanish Google-Translate-English to Tagalog Google-Translate-English to Portuguese Google-Translate-English to Vietnamese