Text Options for the Visually Impaired Font Size: a- A+ Color: A A A Revert 
Close vision bar
Open vision bar
Lessons

Week 17 Day(s) Due to inclement weather, the following lessons were condensed beginning on Wednesday. Please continue to work on language lessons grade 5 verbs.

 

Activator Growth mindset # 3 Respond using RACE

A sentence is also known as a clause, what must it contain to be correct?

 

Teaching and Learning

Study Island Grade 5 Verbs

Summarizer:Activator game

Go to the following website and play the connotation game. Let's see who can get the highest score!

https://www.ixl.com/ela/grade-4/positive-and-negative-connotation


 

Week 17 Day 2 (snow)

Journal Entry #2

Standards: ELAGSE6RL10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

ELAGSE6L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., cause/effect, part/whole, item/category) to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). ELAGSE6-8L6: Acquire and accurately use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

EQ: Am I able to relate knowledge from several sources to better understand techniques writers use in Poetry?

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

Begin lesson viewing a student paced Nearpod presentation for Connotation/Denotation.

https://share.nearpod.com/vsph/oPy8TQViOx

Students will turn and talk to neighbor. Answer questions on whiteboards raise to show answer when instructed to do so. Teacher whole group clarifies topics, meanings and leads to other examples.

Differentiation:

For this introductory activity of new terminology students will be paired in groups of two based on level 3/1 higher level and remedial.

Summary  https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/what-is-poetry/video/  emphasize the word literal and compare to denotation. Other words such as explicit etc. Have students share examples of literal versus implicit.

Quiz items Flocabulary

Week 13 Day 3

Warm up November daily writing prompt. Ask Mr. Stick to explain how to determine a male from a female roach.

Standards: ELAGSE6RL10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

ELAGSE6L5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context. b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., cause/effect, part/whole, item/category) to better understand each of the words. c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). ELAGSE6L6: Acquire and accurately use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

EQ: Am I able to relate knowledge from several sources to better understand techniques writers use in Poetry?

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

Analyze two poems then complete activity.

POETRY

Since everyone reacts emotionally to certain words, writers often deliberately select words that they think will influence your reactions and appeal to your emotions. Read the dictionary definition (DENOTATION) below.

cock roach (kok' roch'), n. any of an order of nocturnal insects, usually brown with flattened oval bodies, some species of which are household pests inhabiting kitchens, areas around water pipes, etc. [Spanish cucaracha]

 

What does the word cockroach mean to you?

 

 

Is a cockroach merely an insect or is it also a household nuisance and a disgusting creature?

 

 

READ THE TWO POEMS ON THE ATTACHED PAGE AND CONSIDER THE DIFFERENCE

IN MEANING AS A RESULT OF THE CONNOTATIVE MEANINGS OF THE POET’S CHOICE

OF DICTION.

Reread the dictionary definition.

  1. Which of the denotative characteristics of a cockroach both poets include in their poems?

  2.  

 

  1. What characteristics does Wild give his roaches that are not in the dictionary definition?

  2.  

 

 

  1. What additional characteristics does Morley give to roaches?

  2.  

 

 

  1. Which poet succeeds in giving roaches favorable connotations?

  2.  

 

  1. Which poet comes closer to expressing your own feelings about roaches?

  2.  

 

 

Roaches

Last night when I got up

to let the dog out I spied

a cockroach in the bathroom

crouched flat on the cool

porcelain,

delicate

antennae probing the toothpaste cap

and feasting himself on a gob

of it in the bowl:

I killed him with one unprofessional

blow, scattering arms and legs and half his body in the sink...

I would have no truck with roaches,

crouched like lions in the ledges of sewers

their black eyes in the darkness

alert for tasty slime,

breeding quickly and without design, laboring up drainpipes through filth to the light;

I read once they are among

the most antediluvian of creatures, surviving everything, and in more primitive times thrived to the size of your hand...

yet when sinking asleep

or craning at the stars,

I can feel their light feet

probing in my veins,

their whiskers nibbling

the insides of my toes;

and neck arched, feel their patient scrambling up the dark tubes of my throat.

--Peter Wild



 

 

 

 

 

from Nursery Rhymes for the Tender-hearted

Scuttle, scuttle, little roach-

How you run when I approach:Up above the pantry shelf Hastening to secrete yourself.

Most adventurous of vermin,

How I wish I could determine How you spend your hours of ease, Perhaps reclining on the cheese.

Cook has gone, and all is dark-

Then the kitchen is your park;In the garbage heap that she leaves Do you browse among the tea leaves?

How delightful to suspect

All the places you have trekked:Does your long antenna whisk its Gentle tip across the biscuits?

Do you linger, little soul,

Drowsing in our sugar bowl?Or, abandonment most utter, Shake a shimmy on the butter?

Do you chant your simple tunes

Swimming in the baby's prunes?Then, when dawn comes, do you slink Homeward to the kitchen sink?

Timid roach, why be so shy?

We are brothers, thou and I, In the midnight, like yourself, I explore the pantry shelf!

--Christopher Morley

 

 

 Summary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZ3LE5hD96A

TOTD  Students will tell one example they recall as they leave the class.

 

Week 17 Day 4

EQ: What is the purpose of identifying an author’s background before reading their work? What items make up the setting? What is bias? Is this the same meaning as perspective?

Activator: Journal Entry # 4

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

Students will use the Cornell Note taking strategy as they read the following biography. They must have at least 5 unfamiliar words, give the gist of his career, and background information of the time period.

THE BIOGRAPHY OF ROBERT FROST

Robert Frost was a poet who lived from 1874 - 1963. He lived an amazing life that involved him marrying the love of his life and winning 4 Pulitzer Prizes for his poetry. He became well known for his poetic works that depicted a realistic view of New England life. Robert Frost was born March 26, 1874, in San Francisco, California to journalist William Prescott Frost, Jr., and Isabelle Moodie, but moved to Massachusetts shortly after the passing of his father. He lived in Massachusetts with his mother and grandparents. Here, Frost attended school and met the love of his life, Elinor White. Both he and Elinor shared the honor of being high school valedictorians. In fact, it ends up that they shared most of their lives together from this point forward. With that said, after graduation in 1892, Frost attended Dartmouth College while Elinor would attend St. Lawrence University. In 1894, Frost began exploring his talents in poetry by writing his very first poem titled “The Butterfly: an Elegy.” This work was published in a weekly literary journal called The Independent. The success of this poem led him to gather the courage to propose to Elinor. She turned him down! With a strong value for education, she wanted to first finish her schooling before starting a family. Frost respected her decision and soon left for Virginia. Upon his return Elinor had finally graduated college, and Frost would propose marriage again. This time, Elinor would accept his proposal.They were married at Harvard University in 1895 and had their first child a year later. A year after the birth of their first child, Frost began attending Harvard University. Frost did not finish his education at Harvard due to health issues and the fact that Elinor became pregnant with their second child. In 1900, Frost and his family moved to a farm that his grandfather had purchased for them. They resided on the farm for 12 years and raised their family. Elinor had four more children during the years on the farm. Sadly, they lost two of their children. One to cholera and one to complications shortly after birth. This was a very difficult time in their life. Despite the challenges and difficulty that Frost experienced, he became quite acclimated to life in the country and dove into his writing. Much of his writing depicted rural life in the country (New England specifically) and allowed him a creative outlet that would prove to be fruitful. In 1912 Frost moved he and his family to England where he would be exposed to a more open group of publishers willing to take a chance on his poetry and writing talent. Shortly after his move to England, at age 38, Frost would find a publisher that would publish his first book of poems, A Boy’s Will. His next book, North of Boston, would be published a year later. Frost formed quite a wonderful reputation for himself in the world of poetry. Sadly, WWI broke out in 1914, and Frost and his family were forced to move back to the states. Frost and Elinor purchased a New Hampshire farm and settled down. Frost’s reputation and accomplishments opened up many doors for him and allowed him a career teaching college and reciting poetry to crowds who were eager to hear his work. He taught on and off for a span of 45 years. Upon retirement, Frost had earned 4 Pulitzer Prizes for his poetry and over 40 honorary degrees. He spoke and performed a reading of his poetry at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy on January 20, 1961. He even had a school and library named after him during his lifetime. However, Frost died in 1963 due to complication during a prostate surgery. He was buried at the Old Bennington Cemetery in Bennington, Vermont. His reputation and works would ensure though he was gone, he would never be forgotten.

Summary TOTD

Why do you think the author’s background influences and inspires his writing especially when it comes to setting . Is this a major contributing factor? Explain.

Day 5

E.Q.

What tactics do authors use to support tone and theme in their writing?

ELAGSE6RL1, ELAGSE6RL2, ELAGSE6RL5 ELA GSE6RL6

Activator: Journal Entry #5

 

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

The Road Not Taken by Robert Lee Frost

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUaQgRiJukA  read version

Handouts given of Frost Poem questions and analysis included. Writing prompt will be completed after a second poem “Butterfly” is read next week.

ELAGSE6RL1, ELAGSE6RL2, ELAGSE6RL5 ELA GSE6RL6

 

Insert picture of brilliant colors

What is the tone and mood this photo? How does the photo make you feel? What things did the artist do to make you feel this way? Use information from your close read questions to support your statements. Consider the colors, lighting, style.

 

Students will read stanzas 3 & 4.

 

Students will work on close reading questions for stanzas 3 & 4.

 

Students will complete the connotation/denotation handout and the decoding handout.

Summary: Concrete Angel mood and tone examples

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtNYA4pAGjI

What is the tone and mood of  this video? How does it make you feel? What things did the artist do to make you feel this way?

Use information from your close read questions to support your statements.

Consider the colors, lighting, style.

 

Contact Us
Polk School District 612 South College St.
Cedartown, GA 30125
View Map & Directions
Phone: 770-748-3821
Fax: 770-748-5131
Translator     
Google-Translate-Chinese (Simplified) BETA Google-Translate-English to French Google-Translate-English to German Google-Translate-English to Italian Google-Translate-English to Japanese BETA Google-Translate-English to Korean BETA Google-Translate-English to Russian BETA Google-Translate-English to Spanish Google-Translate-English to Tagalog Google-Translate-English to Portuguese Google-Translate-English to Vietnamese